How do you preserve your dags against oxidation?

Home Forums Contemporary Daguerreotypy How do you preserve your dags against oxidation?

This topic contains 10 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  titisteph 2 years ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #17456

    titisteph
    Member

    Hello,

    I still didn’t find an effective way for sealing my dags into my cases, in order to preserve them against oxygen and pollution.
    I’m desesperate to discover, after a few months, some brown stains all over the edges of my plates.

    Do you have a way (not too complicate!) to seal your dags perfectly?

    Thank you so much!

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #17458

    titisteph
    Member

    I explain my “bad” process. Please, hep me to find where I’m wrong!

    First, I use a neutral cardboard with a hole in order to see it. I protect this behind a glass.
    Then, I use a”hot glue gun” like this :

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #17460

    titisteph
    Member

    I fix the plate to the cardboard with the hot glue gun.
    Then, I fix the cardboard to the glass by putting some hot glue all over the edges of the glass/cardboard. It’s difficult, but I think it’s a perfect way not to let the air reaching the plate.

    After that, I add some Filmoplats P90 tape all over the edges.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #17462

    titisteph
    Member

    Here is the back.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #17464

    titisteph
    Member

    Next step : I add an aluminium foil sticked with P90, in order to protect all the back against air.

    And the result, despite all that work, oxidation comes after only 3 to 6 months!

    What’s wrong?

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #17466

    titisteph
    Member

    I explain my “bad” process. Please, hep me to find where I’m wrong!

    First, I use a neutral cardboard with a hole in order to see the plate. I protect this behind a glass.
    Then, I use a”hot glue gun” like this :

    #17467

    titisteph
    Member

    error

    #17468

    greg7mdp
    Moderator

    Hi, I think your sealing method is a little complicated, but my main worry is the mat (passe-partout, that you call cardboard) you use. You say it is neutral. I assume you mean “buffered”.

    Buffered mat contain calcium carbonate. This can be very bad for dags (see https://books.google.com/books?id=FLTyvuWX6MMC&pg=PA173&dq=daguerreotype+buffered+mat&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAGoVChMIneea9tj0xgIVBDaICh11cQJe#v=onepage&q=daguerreotype%20buffered%20mat&f=false).

    You must used unbuffered mats (passe-partout musée sans reserve alcaline).

    Bon courage!

    #17469

    titisteph
    Member

    Thank you for your help!
    I didn’t expect my mat (passe-partout) may be guilty!
    I did a little research on Internet about unbuffered mats : it’s extremely expensive (sometimes 450 Euros/$ for one large sheet!!) and rare. And there is a poor choice of colors (only white or cream).

    I’m disappointed and sad…

    But I wonder if mat is the only one responsible : I stored several plates preserved with my method into a plastic bag, and I noticed none oxidation.

    Is it possible for you to explain how do you proceed? What is your method?

    #17470

    greg7mdp
    Moderator

    Well, I don’t know about France but it is not that expensive in the US. Here are 10 sheets, each enough for 4 whole plates: unbuffered mat

    If the plates stored in the plastic bag are fine, then it means that the sealing you are doing is not effecive and oxygen is going through to the plate.

    #17471

    titisteph
    Member

    Thank you for your answer! I’m goint to purchase that kind of board. Hope it’ll solve my trouble.

    Is anybody can explain his own method for sealing his plates? I still didn’t find any good explanation about that.

    Everybody speak about polishing, iodine, etc. But it’s very difficult to find good (easy to use!) informations about sealing.

    Thank you!

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Return to the Top